Revolution vs Coup – Mubarak vs Morsi

I’ve been seeing this argument, if it is a military coup or not, in the western media after ousting Morsi. I’m really, REALLY, pissed off at the western media coverage, which gives no tiny credit to the power of the people. Turning the whole process from a democratic process to a ballotocracy process (from ballots). The western media think that democracy is a rigid contract between the elected person and the people through the ballots boxes, a contract that can not be retracted by the people when they realize how the country is going to a catastrophe.

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This same media who cheered for Mubarak ousting, and couldn’t care less about constitutional violations Morsi, and the MB, are responsible for. The same constitution that was agreed upon, though it wasn’t written with the consent of all the Egyptian people, thanks to the MB and the rest of the Islamic forces, who wrote the constitution. The same media didn’t care less for the unlawful--actions--Morsi--and--the--MB are responsible for. Their failing in all fields: 1. Politically: through numerous barriers and destruction of the democratic transition period, keeping only Islamic political parties on their side, excluding any other party or union against their own interests, as well as unnecessary constitutional declarations.  2. Economically: Through increasing local and external debt to exponential levels, and keeping Mubarak’s corruption to gain its benefits for the sake of the MB.  and 3. Human rights: By cheering for the Army and Police who had numerous documented cases of human rights violations.

Morsi and the MB gave more power to the Army, keeping their economic interests as well as putting the military trial in the constitution for the first time in history, and NOT giving a damn about Army human rights violations since the 18 days till now. To make it worse, he gave medals of honor to SCAF members. And I will not talk about raising the police wages for more than 300%, while not giving a damn about them not working on getting back security, while the MB cry now about not being protected.

The same Morsi who won as a result of fear of the return of direct military rule if Shafik, the military background nominee, and ex-PM, won. The same Morsi who appointed the military personnel responsible for announcing virginity checks as Minister of Defence, who ironically gave the orders of his ousting. The same Morsi who promoted Army personnel responsible for assaulting and murdering fellow Egyptians. The same Morsi who thanked the Armed Forces who put 12 thousand people in jail for military tribunals without giving enough thought to retrial them again in front of civilian Judges. Morsi who gave permission to try civilians in front of military courts after he became president.The same Morsi who even threatened the use of military trials against civilians protesting against him in his last speech!

Now let’s go back to Mubarak’s ousting. After 18 days of Egyptians struggling and after Army-US-Mubarak continuous negotiations, Mubarak stepped down. Don’t get me wrong, I will never even think that the revolution was a US conspiracy to change the Middle East, ironically as some Islamists believe(d). I believe, and I will always believe, that the Egyptian people are the main and sometimes the only, factor affecting every single step happening in Egypt. But US intervention to keep things from “running out of hands” is a fact. Wikileaks mentioned several times that over the years, even before the revolution, the MB were always an alternative to Mubarak.

The US, kept watching/preparing/nurturing, however you call it depending on your background, an Islamic trend in the Arab Spring, and prepared its foreign policy to fund, directly or indirectly, this moderate Islamic trend, to protect US economic as well as political cough--Israeli--cough interests. While everything was going as prepared, via a not really valid elections, run under deep Islamic propaganda, surprisingly allowed by the mostly secular SCAF, Islamists won as scheduled, not only in Egypt but, as a direct influence from winning in Egypt, in other Arab Spring countries as well.

With Morsi’s ousting, this preparation is 100% screwed. The US now do not have a plan B for preparing their interests. It is all the Egyptian people move now, the move that has no regard for any other country’s interests but Egypt. The result? All US media are defaming what the Egyptian people want, the millions of people across all Egypt who are no longer interested in enduring more failure and embarrassment, more frustration with Morsi’s breaking promises, promises he made for the Egyptian people, promises he made to Egyptians elite, promises he vowed for economic advancement the moment he becomes a president. Morsi himself mentioned that the people should revolt against him if he didn’t do well.

So you can not call one of the two oustings a revolution, and the other a coup. So, western media, make your same choice to both, give some credit to the Egyptian people and stop being a fucking ignorant. Thank you.

12 Responses to Revolution vs Coup – Mubarak vs Morsi
  1. Gabriela Reply

    Once again, I wish the best for your country.

  2. Mohamed ElGohary Reply

    Thanks my dear, same wishes goes to you :)

  3. Ryan Daniels Reply

    I agree with you completely about the Western media’s reporting and editorializing about what is happening in Egypt. People outside Egypt (myself included) are ignorant of the background, facts and context of a developing situation like this. The problem with the media using terms like “coup” is that it causes people to react viscerally, emotionally, to that term — and not to what is actually happening.

    • Mohamed ElGohary Reply

      One can not call one of the two oustings a revolution, and the other a coup. So one should make the same choice to both.

  4. Darla Hueske Reply

    Oh, soooo true.

  5. Tarek Amr (@gr33ndata) Reply

    Mel akher, “One can not call one of the two oustings a revolution, and the other a coup. So one should make the same choice to both”.

  6. [...] Many are continuing to debate whether the ousting of former Egyptian president Mohamed Morsi was the res... https://globalvoices.org/2013/07/16/revolution-or-coup-the-ousting-of-morsi
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  9. Deborah Reply

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ha_yLztQKIQ

    Inquisition
    “Uproar”

    She said,
    “Boy answer the question”
    And we’ve been patiently waiting all our lives
    Told me to sit down and shut up all our lives

    [Chorus:]
    And this is the uproar
    Uproar, uproar,
    This is the uproar
    Uproar, uproar, uproar
    This is the uproar
    Go!

    For the prisoner of conscience
    Walking fearing where you tread
    Crimes against the people that the government led
    Amnesty now for an innocent dread
    (Is it) Only for the rich that the poor get bled

    [Chorus]

    For the mind of my sister fight the one eyed views
    Body of my mother torn broken and abused
    People in the cities and the streets beating down
    Color culture stand together
    Make this sound
    Make this sound
    So won’t you make this, make this, make this sound

    Because you said,
    “Boy answer the question”
    And we’ve been patiently waiting all our lives
    Told me to sit down and shut up all our lives
    Knocking me out of my head
    Into my heart as it’s bled
    Knocking me out of my head
    Into the heart as it’s bled, out

    Because we sing
    An oi oi song
    And a unity song [x4]

    Old conflict put them to bed
    Real enemy please show your head
    Old conflict put them to bed
    Will the real enemy please show your head

    Woah

    • kyle Reply

      thomas barnett wrote these lyrics while with inquisition, the line “amnesty now for an innocent dread” is in reference to Mumia Abu-Jamal.

      But the spirit of the song embodies the repression scene in the 90s by such governments as Egypt, etc. And that only the people, can change things. “You might have the fruit but we will always have the seed”

      Glad to see a reference to one of his powerful lsongs.

  10. Deborah Reply

    Why they condemn the “coup”? Because they don’t want anyone getting any bright ideas, especially within the US borders. They are next, one way or another, and they are greatly disturbed by this fact.

    That is the Fed, the Corporations, the Military… some Democrats, some Republicans…

    The Libertarian movement is behind you, emerging as a 3rd major party.

    WE ARE WITH YOU and have nothing but contempt for how the US media has handled this situation! You are not alone!

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